Dull Men’s Pole

I recently attended an evening hosted by the Dull Men’s Club which turned out to be anything but dull.  Our host for this conviviality was the wryly enthusiastic assistant vice-president of D.M.C. Grover Click – who doubles as founder of the Park Bench Appreciation Society.  Wine, beer and cashew nuts were consumed as we heard talks and presentations from luminaries of the world of esoterics.  One of whom was Richard Gottfried, who together with his wife Emily are Crazy Golf champions (possibly) of the World.  And they are on a mission to locate, play and document every crazy golf course on the planet – to date, more than 700 courses and counting.  Now, I’ve sat through scores of presentations over the years but rarely so engaging and educating as this.

Anyway, on a search of crazy golf courses in Cumbria, and in particular around Barrow in Furness, Richard stopped off at the Hatherthwaite & Lakeside heritage steam railway – as you do – where he spotted this fine pole across the platform at Hatherthwaite station.  “Is it of interest to you?” he asks. As If !

One final synchronistic fact.  Turns out 21st September is not only Telegraph Pole Appreciation Day, but it is also Miniature Golf Day too.  Would you Adam & Eve?

 

Web: http://hamandeggerfiles.blogspot.co.uk
Minigolf consultancy: http://gottfriedmarketing.co.uk/minigolf-consultancy

Dioramist’s diorama

Esteemed member #0654 is Paul Kirkup.  He knows a thing or two about telegraph poles.  Little ones, model ones, diorama-sized ones.  He made the 10 inch model that now adorns our mantelpiece - next to the photo of my bank manager.

Anyway, now that the weather is better, Paul ventured outside to show us some of the things that adorn his curtilage  He has a passion for the old London Midland Region of British Railways and this is reflected by the station and platform he has built in his garden.  Painted red and cream of course.  And what does a station need but a telegraph pole. So...

..."I bought the longest wooden pole I could find and fitted it with a cross arm and two spindles and insulators. As I am also interested in old forms of lighting, I added a suitable light fitting which switches on at dusk and goes off at midnight. There are no wires to the pole - yet - but planning is underway and two-way communication between the house and station should be achieved using a pair of field telephones, Army, type F."

Paul also sent us a photo of the remnant of a crossarm unearthed whilst rummaging in the undergrowth at Craigellachie station...

..."Now mounted on a stub pole which will eventually form part of the station communications network mentioned above. The position I found the relic in, just beyond the end of the station platform, means that it must have been mounted on the pole adjacent to the signal box, a photo of which I found in a book. It is rather nice to be able to see a photo of something now preserved for posterity, or at least as long as I am around to look after it, following which my nearest and dearest will probably chuck it in a skip!"

Paul's cakebox diorama came to the attention of the Editor of British Railway Modelling magazine, who commissioned him to write and illustrate some railway modelling projects for the mag. The second of these articles concerns the authentic modelling of telegraph poles. Paul tells us he feels that most modellers simply plant model poles straight out of the box, without much thought as to their authenticity. This has to change.  I feel a campaign coming on.